Author Topic: DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD  (Read 63551 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Ice Storm

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 378
  • I'm a llama!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 1
Re:HD-DVD and Blu-ray discs
« Reply #120 on: Oct 04, 2003 at 09:09 PM »
Releasing HD-DVD & Blu-ray media technology isnt practical at the moment because only a small fraction of TV owners own a TV set that can display their images properly.

Who'd buy technology that is too advance for almost all TV owners?

Check this out http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,60675,00.html

If you like Star Trek go visit Pinoy Star Trek forums
« Last Edit: Oct 04, 2003 at 10:25 PM by Ice Storm »

Offline Tonton

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • This is your world now.
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:HD-DVD and Blu-ray discs
« Reply #121 on: Oct 05, 2003 at 07:07 AM »
hey thanks for that link!  :)

I'm just saying that, it's the way it is, technology delay is a business tactic, yun lang naman.  :)

Offline panic

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • I'm a llama!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:HD-DVD and Blu-ray discs
« Reply #122 on: Oct 14, 2003 at 06:15 PM »
delaying new products is stupid. greed is eternal. :)

Offline Tonton

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 13
  • This is your world now.
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:HD-DVD and Blu-ray discs
« Reply #123 on: Oct 14, 2003 at 07:05 PM »
Right on! Let's Panic!  ;D

Offline Kahon

  • Konsehal
  • Trade Count: (0)
  • DVD Guru
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,253
  • Hmpppp!!!!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:HD-DVD and Blu-ray discs
« Reply #124 on: Oct 28, 2003 at 04:20 PM »
China aiming at better-than-DVD format
By Staff, CNETAsia
28/10/2003
URL: http://asia.cnet.com/newstech/personaltech/0,39001147,39156239,00.htm
Teams in China aim to release full specifications for a higher-end complement to the DVD format next month.

The new format, called EVD (Enhanced Versatile Disc), will be playable only on EVD players and promises five times the image quality of DVD movies and a higher computer data storage capacity, according the official Xinhua news agency.

The first EVD players for home consumers will become available in China next year. Details about the format, such as storage capacity, compression format for audio and video files and type of reading laser used have so far been kept under wraps.

Development on the EVD standard began in 1999 and since then, several announced launch dates have been cancelled.

The China-developed EVD standard is among several projects supported by the government in its drive to reduce license fee payments and "shake off dependence on foreign technologies in production", according to Xinhua.

The EVD standard does not appear to be a user-recordable format for now, and aims to complement the DVD movie format for those with high-definition TVs. Talks are going on with film distributors to introduce content on EVD.

An EVD player will cost about US$240, compared with around US$85 for the average cost of a domestic DVD player. China-made home DVD players account for up to 70 per cent of the world market. China produced over 30 million DVD players last year.

Chinese manufacturers will welcome the new format, which promises to lead them out of low-end price wars and into the higher-value end of the market, said Xinhua.

The company developing EVD, Beijing E-World Digital Technology, comprises government bodies and 10 domestic electronics manufactuerers.

Outside China, competitors have developed similar high-capacity optical disc formats in order the push DVD technology forward.

A DVD-recordable standard, known as Blu-ray, is being promoted by companies including Hitachi, LG Electronics, Matsucrapa Electric Idustrial, Pioneer, Royal Philips Electronics, Samsung Electronics, Sharp, Sony and Thomson.

Blu-ray technology is designed to allow a single-sided, 12-centimeter disc to hold up to 27GB of storage. The technology uses a short-wavelength blue-violet laser--instead of the red lasers in current optical drives--to read data.

Ding Kangyuan, and official with the trade body the China Audio Industries Association (CAIA), believed that if EVD products appear in China within the next three years, it can outflank Blu-ray, at least in the home market.

News.com's Ricard Shim contributed to this report.

Offline slowhand

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • PinoyDVD Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,269
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
China moves from DVD to EVD
« Reply #125 on: Nov 19, 2003 at 10:13 AM »
While I know I won't be buying this technology, as I'd rather wait for the real HD-DVD, it's always interesting what the world's biggest maker of DVD players is up to.

What do you think?

Read the article here.

Offline sgc_wdi

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • DVD Guru
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,016
  • Hello!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #126 on: Nov 20, 2003 at 10:21 AM »
Interesting, at least by next year may discs na for HDTV's...

HD-DVD is taking so long...

Offline himura

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • DVD Addict
  • ***
  • Posts: 997
  • D'oh!!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #127 on: Dec 02, 2003 at 11:58 AM »
Check out this report from IGN:

DVD Forum Approves Next-Gen DVD (But don't worry, your DVD collection is safe for a few years.)
December 01, 2003

The DVD Forum has formally adopted the Advanced Optical Disc (AOD) format under development by Toshiba Corp. and NEC Corp. as the next-generation DVD drive, but in the near-term, it doesn't mean a whole lot.

Toshiba and NEC have been developing AOD while Sony Corp., Matsucrapa Electric Industrial Co. and Philips Electronics have been developing the Blu-ray DVD format. Both use a blue laser technology, which will have much higher resolution than standard DVD and much higher disc capacity.

The approval does not rule out development of the Blu-ray format. Sony, Panasonic and Philips are members of the DVD Forum, along with Toshiba and NEC. Blu-ray will use a 128-bit AES encryption system, significantly stronger than the 40-bit encryption on DVD that was broken in 1999.

A single-layer Blu-ray DVD has 25GB of storage while a dual layer disk has 50GB of storage. AOD's capacity is 15 GB for a single-layer disk and 30 GB for a dual-layer disk. DVD, by contrast, has 4.7GB capacity on a single-layer disc and 9.4GB on a dual layer disk.

Both AOD and Blu-ray are still in the development stages and won't be on the market for some time. While still under development, some advantages are already apparent. Blu-ray is recordable out of the box while AOD is not. But AOD will have an easier time being backwards-compatible with existing DVD disks because they use the same lens. Also, an AOD disc can be manufactured on the same production machines used to make DVDs today, whereas Blu-ray will require new production lines.

If you thought DVD was expensive when it launched, hold on to your wallet. Toshiba and NEC say AOD decks will run around $2,700, while the first Blu-ray player from Sony is on sale in Japan for around $4,000.

Plus, Forum approval doesn't mean products will start flowing. "It reminds me a little bit of the adoption of the DVD-RW format as another DVD Forum-approved format," says Wolfgang Schlichting, research director for removable storage at IDC. "That did not mean that anybody besides Pioneer was actually developing and marketing products in that format for a while."

However, Schlichting has his doubts that Blu-ray or AOD will reach the mass market, "because DVD has so much life in it. It's good enough for most end users for video quality. There is a good case that DVD will be the mass market of choice for the vast majority of end users for the next ten years." He also adds that none of the movie studios have not pledged any support to either format as yet.

He does think that Pixonics, which delivers High Definition TV resolution on current-generation red laser DVD players, has a chance in the marketplace. "I'm still optimistic that there's a lot of life left in red laser DVD technology and any incremental improvement that doesn't add much cost to the drive will be attractive to end users. There's no near-term significant incentive for end-users to abandon DVD technology," he says.


What do you guys think?

Offline basurero

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Apprentice
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #128 on: Dec 02, 2003 at 01:06 PM »
HD-DVD is coming.  So what?  Do you have an HDTV yet?  Are you willing
to spend more money for HD-DVDs?  I will guarantee you they will cost
more than the current DVD prices.  Think "laserdisc" pricing.  Also as a
reminder, most of those TV series  available on current DVD's won't be
getting any better on HD-DVD.  Most are as good as they get on current
DVD technology.  Maybe if it's a newer show., but most aren't.

No, I wouldn' worry too much about HD-DVD.  It's still a few years off.
  Sure, it'll look great and sound great.  It will also be more
expensive.  I was sold on current DVD technology because of

A) widescreen anamorphic image
B) digital sound
B) low pricing

I never collected VHS tapes.  But now I could finally buy a movie uncut,
uncropped, usually with some bonus features all for a reasonable price.
  They work in both home players and computers.  DVD's are a great value.

When HD-DVD arrives it will also take awhile for content to build.  If
anything, I might buy a very few of my all time favorite movies, but for
the most part I am quite content with the current DVD format.  I do own
a true HDTV myself, but I'm still not all hyped about HD-DVD.

********************
********************

Personally I'm not too worried about whatever HD-DVD format that
comes since at this point it will be YEARS before it will finally hit the
market place. First they'll agree upon a disc format - which will take
a long time. Then it will be copyright protection - which will add more
time. Finally it will be marketing, getting content, etc etc etc... again,
more time. Then - if - and a BIG if - will retail stores even want to carry
it when DVDs are flying off the shelves faster than a speeding bullet?

At most in my opinion HD-DVD, much like SACD, will be at best
a cult format like Laserdisc and Minidisc are. Not a bad thing, and
to the people who use them they do serve their purpose (as I just
listened to several SACDs tonight).

********************
********************

> I pretty much agree with all of this. There is one minor(or major
> depending on how you look at it) thing to note though. There's a lot
> of talk that the HD-DVD format will be inside a protective caddie. This
> would give HD-DVD a huge advantage in the rental market and you could
> see giants like Cocksucker and Hollywood perpously phasing out
> standard DVD's for the new HD-DVD's. You say, "big deal... the movie
> industry doesn't live off of rentals alone." But if you think about it, it is a
> pretty big deal.

Even I know that the rental market is pretty big when even grocery stores
have rentals in them. Of course that's not so much in my area these days
since we got a few ma and pa stores around.

> How has a horrible format like VHS managed to last
> nearly 30 years and is still somehow hanging(just barely, but still
> hanging none-the-less) on even after DVD's have become the new
> standard?

1) People can easily record on VHS... however DVD recording is still in its
early stages and not quite ready for the mass consumer level. I will admit
that DVD recording is getting better and better as time goes on but in my opinion
they got a ways to go yet.

2) Even with DVD players as cheap as they are, some people refuse to jump
aboard. I get at least one person a day at my store complaining why we don't
sell VHS in our stores anymore. Then again, on the other side of the coin in
a way I prefer VHS to stay alive since - after all - if VHS is still alive
then those P&S lovers can still buy their taevae filling crap to their hearts content
there.

> The rental market of course. VHS became the dominant format because of
> it's "ready for rental" design. Sell-through VHS did very little to
> keep it afloat. It was almost entirely rental VHS that has kept it around
> way past it's expiration date.

Yep. When they were charging $100 per video to the rentals you can see why
studios prefered the two tier rental system. But now with DVD around its
amazing how quickly the studios have gone from the two tier rental system to
straight to retail. But like I pointed out there are people who refuse to
for one reason or another jump to DVD, so its those people that are going to keep
VHS alive.

> I hope I'm wrong though as I'm not all that interested in HD-DVD(it's
> a
> lot of hype and not much else) and I don't experience trouble with
> rental DVD's(like so many others 'claim' to), so I could care less
> about
> a protective caddie.

I wouldn't mind having HD-DVD for a few films myself like the "Lord
Of The Rings" trilogy, but for the most part the current DVDs we got
for many films to me will still look great 10 years from now as they do
now.


source: alt.dvd.video mailing list

Offline espace

  • Trade Count: (+63)
  • DVD Addict
  • ***
  • Posts: 703
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #129 on: Dec 29, 2003 at 04:22 PM »
Here's an article from today's (12/29/03) edition of The New York Times

Heavyweights Are Choosing Sides in Battle Over Next DVD Format

December 29, 2003
 By KEN BELSON

TOKYO, Dec. 28 - When Hisashi Yamada pulls back his bow, he thinks of only one thing: Hitting the bull's-eye 92 feet away.

"When I concentrate on the target," said Mr. Yamada, a champion archer who demonstrates his skill dressed in the traditional blue-and-white hakama, "I forget about everything else."

In his regular job, Mr. Yamada, a 60-year-old electrical engineer, is putting that same single-minded focus to work for the Toshiba Corporation, which is battling like a Japanese samurai warrior of old in a fight to the finish over whose format will be used in the next generation of DVD's.

The discs, which have been under development for several years, will hold four to five times more digital video and audio data than those now on the market. They are needed because broadcasters and movie studios are planning to take advantage of the spread of high-definition television screens to produce more digital programming with multitrack sound and much better resolution.

The new discs and their players will not be widely available until at least 2005, but already the world's largest electronics, computer and entertainment companies are embroiled in a multibillion-dollar fight over whose technology will become an industry standard.

The arguments are in many ways reminiscent of the Betamax-VHS showdown in the 1970's and the clashes over digital audiotape, compact discs and the original digital videodiscs released in 1997. As in those battles, technology is just the starting point for debates filled with emotion and industry politics.

Beyond the technical details like tracking speed and tilt is a serious tussle over how to divide - and protect - the billions of dollars in royalties from the licensing of this technology and the content sold on the discs. Also at stake is an effort by electronics makers to prevent emerging Chinese rivals and well-established Silicon Valley computer makers from making significant inroads into the home entertainment business.

"This is a very intense conflict over intellectual property," said Warren N. Lieberfarb, a driving force behind the development of the original DVD format. It has the added overlay, he said, "of the Japanese, Korean and European consumer electronics industries fearing China's aggressively emerging consumer electronics industry as well as the PC industry."

At the technological level, the combatants are divided roughly into two camps. Under Mr. Yamada's leadership, NEC and Toshiba have formed a group that has developed the HD (high definition) DVD, a disc that is 0.6 millimeter thick and made with machinery similar to that used for today's DVD's. On the other side is the 10-company Blu-ray Group, led by Sony and Matsucrapa, whose best-known brands are Panasonic and JVC. That group has developed a disc only 0.1 millimeter thick that can hold more data but needs additional investment to be produced. Information on the discs can be overwritten after it is recorded, something that is not possible with the HD DVD's now.

At 12 centimeters in diameter, both discs are similar to today's offerings, though Sony's discs are protected from fingerprints, dust and scratches by square plastic cartridges when not in use. The HD DVD group has developed a single lens that emits red and blue rays to read both current and next-generation discs. The Blu-ray machines require two separate lenses.

While the discs are still at least a year away from mass production, both sides are expected to be out in full body armor trying to win new allies at the big Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Jan. 8 through 11, where they are planning to show prototypes of their devices.

There are many battles left to fight, though, before these new DVD's hit the shelves, and it is entirely possible that the camps will never reach a consensus, forcing consumers, retailers, movie studios and others to adapt, at least initially, to two competing standards.

In the Betamax-VHS war, one standard ultimately triumphed. That is an important reason the two chief antagonists in that fight - Sony, the loser, and Matsucrapa, the winner - are now allies. In the wake of other format conflicts, including the one over the first generation of DVD's, multiple standards co-exist, with the differences papered over by machines that can play several formats. But in other cases, including the development of higher-quality music discs, the disputes seem to have scared away consumers and retailers caught in the middle.

The ideal, everyone involved insists, is for one format to emerge as the winner so costs can be kept to a minimum. But as Mr. Yamada knows, that is about the only thing on which people can agree. In addition to his role at Toshiba, he is chairman of the powerful Technical Coordination Group at the DVD Forum, a six-year-old group of more than 200 companies that is trying to decide on one format.

In November, the HD DVD camp's specifications were endorsed by the forum's steering committee. The victory was significant, but tellingly contentious. The format was not approved until the third ballot, and only after voting rules were changed and several companies abstained. The Blu-ray Group did not submit specifications for a read-only disc, which Hollywood is eager to have for movie sales and rentals.

Mr. Yamada called the negotiations "very delicate," and said the Blu-ray Group was trying to prevent the HD DVD from becoming the industry standard because it does not yet have a solid alternative.

"They don't want to approve HD DVD in the forum, but since they only have rewriteable discs, they can't say theirs is better than ours," said Mr. Yamada, who argues that his goal is to produce an open format that all companies can share. The Blu-ray Group, he said, "wants to control the technological standards themselves."

The HD DVD group may get an additional lift in February, when the Walt Disney Company, Microsoft and Sanyo are expected to take over leadership of the DVD Forum. The three companies have not sided with either format, but are seen by some as friendlier to the Toshiba-NEC group.

Though the two camps produce discs that store similar amounts of data, manufacturers say that the HD DVD discs cost only 15 percent more to produce than current discs, a fraction of what they say the Blu-ray discs will cost. Stamping out prerecorded discs cheaply is the key to wooing Hollywood studios, which want to keep their retail prices low in a business that now brings in more money than movies in first-run theaters. Retailers also want one standard so they do not have to stock two versions of every movie.

"What Hollywood cares about is cost," said Kanji Katsuura, the chief technical officer at Memory-Tech, the second-largest maker of DVD's in Japan. "They basically want the same price as discs now."

Sony and its allies dismiss claims that their technology is too expensive, saying that the cost per disc will naturally fall as production takes off. They also say their rewriteable discs are what consumers really want because they can be used not only to play movies but also to record high-definition digital television programming, now available selectively in the United States and offered on a limited basis in Japan starting this month.

"What we are striving for with Blu-ray is the next stage in the evolution of this technology," said Yukinori Kawauchi, a manager in the planning and control division at Sony's broadband network unit. Such a leap happens only "every 10 or 20 years, like the transition from CD's to DVD's," he said. In April, Sony started selling Blu-ray DVD recorders in Japan, where they cost 378,000 yen, or $3,500, and take discs that sell for 3,000 yen, or about $27. Sony does not release sales figures, but industry sources said only a few hundred players had been sold so far.

Mr. Yamada said Toshiba wanted to introduce DVD recorders in 2005 that cost less than $2,000 and players priced below $1,000. They would be much cheaper than machines using the competing format, but would still be aimed mostly at the early adopters, who are the first to try new technologies. As in the past, the new formats are not expected to take off in the mass market until the price falls sharply.

"The battle really depends on the price level," said Yuki Sugi, a consumer electronics analyst at Deutsche Securities in Tokyo. "When the price falls to 120,000 yen ($1,080), it will catch on. This is a kind of magic number for high-priced electronics."

History indicates that the magic number might be reached earlier than anticipated. Sales of DVD discs and players gathered steam when production began in China, pushing prices lower. But some manufacturers worry that their technology could be used by Chinese rivals, legally or otherwise. This fear, some critics say, is why the Blu-ray group has kept a tight lid on its technology instead of sharing more of its specifications with other members of the DVD Forum. Striking back, nine Chinese companies have said they plan to develop their own DVD formats.

Copyright infringement is another worry. After the rapid spread of illegally copied DVDs, Hollywood is pushing both technical groups to come up with new security measures to protect their movies. Neither group has developed a prototype that satisfies the movie industry - a major impediment to a commercial launch.

"We are very much focused on both picture quality and content protection," said Peter Murphy, senior executive vice president and chief strategic officer at the Walt Disney Company, which has about one-fourth of the home video market. "The consumer electronics manufacturers can come up with the technical standards for the next-generation discs, but unless we also agree on the content protection standards, many of the studios may choose to wait before releasing content in the new format."
 
Also lurking nearby are giants like Microsoft, I.B.M. and Intel, which are eager to work their way into family rooms by promoting their technology for use in set-top boxes, DVD players and digital video recorders with hard disk drives. American computer makers, adept at producing hardware on thin margins by building sophisticated global supply chains, could also develop competing products, turning television into just another function of the home computer.
 
"Younger generations are completely happy working with a mouse, which is better than a 1,000-button remote," said Tom Adams, president of Adams Media Research in Carmel, Calif. "Microsoft can dominate in ways that Sony or Toshiba can't."

Some analysts contend that high-speed Internet connections will ultimately make discs less relevant as consumers download more music and movies, though this is a more distant threat.

For now, discs remain the medium of choice, and the decision on a format will ultimately be up to Hollywood. Some movie executives are leaning toward the HD DVD format because it is seen as the cheaper of the two. But others are still weighing the technological and financial arguments from both groups.

Many in the industry say the worst case would be an endless fight, forcing the public to wrestle with two formats.

If that happens, said Mr. Lieberfarb, the developer of the original DVD format, "everyone is a loser, particularly Hollywood studios, the retailer community and, most importantly, the consumer."

Link to Article: Heavyweights Are Choosing Sides in Battle Over Next DVD Format (registration required)

« Last Edit: Dec 30, 2003 at 11:18 PM by espace »
Your attitude is your life.
Maximize your options.
Never take anything too seriously.

Offline sgc_wdi

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • DVD Guru
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,016
  • Hello!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #130 on: Jan 13, 2004 at 11:14 AM »
an interesting article on HD-DVD and Blu-Ray Disc can be found on The Digital Bits, from CES 2004... there is also a picture of the prototype players and a screen capture of a sample trailer being shown....

http://www.thedigitalbits.com/articles/wces04/report.html

Offline SiCkBoY

  • Trade Count: (+31)
  • PinoyDVD Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,498
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 47
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #131 on: Feb 03, 2004 at 01:59 PM »
The latest issue of Maximum PC briefly discussed the pros and cons of Blu-Ray and AOD (Advanced Optical Disc).  How many formats are really looming on the horizon?

Offline T-850

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • DVD Addict
  • ***
  • Posts: 608
  • you are TERMINATED!!!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #132 on: Feb 11, 2004 at 10:50 AM »
when the day comes when a new version after dvd is available.. how much will dvds cost then? do u guys think it will depreciate as much as LDs did? geez i hope not!

Offline Ice Storm

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 378
  • I'm a llama!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 1
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #133 on: Feb 27, 2004 at 03:33 PM »
DVD Forum approves rewritable HD-DVD format.

Here's to hoping they'll settle on a single format.

Offline jpadua

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • DVD Addict
  • ***
  • Posts: 810
  • www.m2systech.com
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #134 on: Mar 26, 2004 at 04:09 PM »
Pasingit!!! :D

If you own an HDTV... then watch near HD quality DVD using standard DVD discs and an HTPC.  I have been watching standard DVDs scaled to 1080i on my HDTV for almost a yr now.. still nothing comes close to picture quality.. so while HD-DVD or Blueray DVDs are in the not available yet, even if they were they might be too much for an average consumer.. Enjoy the current crop of DVDs.

Offline jmigs

  • Trade Count: (+3)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 146
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re:DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #135 on: Apr 01, 2004 at 09:33 PM »
New DVD format delayed as Hollywood takes the stage

http://www.forbes.com/home_europe/newswire/2004/03/30/rtr1316620.html

delayed because of copy-protection issues.

Offline jpadua

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • DVD Addict
  • ***
  • Posts: 810
  • www.m2systech.com
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
HD-DVD (regular DVD upsampled to 1080i) screenshots
« Reply #136 on: Apr 02, 2004 at 09:17 AM »
I took the liberty of taking comparison screenshots of 480p DVD and 1080i upsampled DVD.

http://www.pinoydvd.com/yabbse/index.php?board=17;action=display;threadid=13274;start=240

Offline jmigs

  • Trade Count: (+3)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 146
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Sony to release Blu-Ray movies on year 2006, what do you think about it?
« Reply #137 on: Apr 02, 2004 at 03:37 PM »
Read here
http://www.eet.com/sys/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleId=18600329

Blu-Ray (BR) "pressed" movies are coming around year 2006, what do you think about it?

a.  Yes, my first BR movies will be xmen3 and jurassic park4
b.  Let the hype past then buy
c.  I'll stop collecting DVDs now or sell them right away.
d.  I gonna transfer my DVDs to Blu-Ray
e.  Forget it!
f.   Nah, Blu-Ray has "blue screen of death" coz they will be using Microsoft's codec.
g.  Nah, Ricoh/Panasonic has 1 terrabyte opitcal disc by the year 2010
h.  My loveones told me that I better stop this ever-changing hobby.

Offline tqpix

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 50
  • Hello, how are you?
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
i.  Wait to find out which one--HD-DVD or Blue-Ray--becomes mainstream before buying.
« Last Edit: Apr 02, 2004 at 03:55 PM by tqpix »

Offline jmigs

  • Trade Count: (+3)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 146
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
i.  Wait to find out which one--HD-DVD or Blue-Ray--becomes mainstream before buying.

No one supports HD-DVD yet, blu-ray has around  13 supporting companies

Offline Jett

  • Trade Count: (+1)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 138
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
b. let the hype pass.

Masyado na 'to magastos.  :)

Offline Y_meeh

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • DVD Addict
  • ***
  • Posts: 556
  • I want adventure in the great wide somewhere-belle
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Forgive my ignorance... i just want to know if blu-ray will be playable in ordinary dvd players?
Lyf seems a succession of busy nothings - Austen

Offline tqpix

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 50
  • Hello, how are you?
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Not from any of the information I've read.  However, regular DVDs are playable in Blu-Ray players.

Offline MiKeBiBbY

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 211
  • This is our year...
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
downward compatibility.  8)

Offline jmigs

  • Trade Count: (+3)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 146
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Forgive my ignorance... i just want to know if blu-ray will be playable in ordinary dvd players?

http://www.blu-ray.philips.com/faq.asp

Q: Since thickness of cartridge varies, would a Blu-ray Disc recorder be compatible with other formats?
A: Blu-ray Disc can be compatible with CD and/or DVD, depending on the specifications. It is not compatible with BD, DVD-RAM and DVD-RW because of their different laser wavelengths.

There are 4 competing formats for the next generation DVD
http://www.hddvd.org/hddvd/difformatsblueray.php

For me, I think Blu-Ray will win

FYI: Since Blu-ray technology is co-owned by Sony, don't expect it on Xbox2

Offline danzig

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Collector
  • **
  • Posts: 91
  • Hello!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
From what I remember, many of the things that are used widely today (like DVDs) were hyped only a few years ago.

Offline sgc_wdi

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • DVD Guru
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,016
  • Hello!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #146 on: Apr 19, 2004 at 11:43 AM »
http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/ptech/04/16/sony.toppan.reut/index.html

Sony is releasing a new disc format, made of 51% paper! The disc is based on the Blu-Ray Disc format, which enables it to hold 25GB of data for a single sided disc. You can read the CNN link for more info :)

Offline jpadua

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • DVD Addict
  • ***
  • Posts: 810
  • www.m2systech.com
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #147 on: Apr 19, 2004 at 01:22 PM »
480p VS 1080i

Uploaded 2 new screenshots, here you can compare regular DVD againts Upscaled DVD content (DVD at 1080i - similar to HDDVD)

A close up shot of Lilu's (Mila Jovavich) face in the movie "The Fifth Element"

480p (864x486 actual pixels)
http://jaypadua.fotopic.net/p3875514.html

1080i (1920x1080 actual pixels)
http://jaypadua.fotopic.net/p3875513.html

I think these images are clear enough to see a big difference in clarity :)

Offline JT

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • PinoyDVD Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,326
  • GOD RULES!!!
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 13
Re: DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #148 on: Apr 21, 2004 at 07:50 PM »
How about the latest media from SONY ... PAPER DVD.


http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20040419/od_afp/japan_it_sony_toppan_040419154919

TOKYO (AFP) -  Electronics giant Sony and another Japanese company have developed a "paper disc" that can record more than two hours of high-definition images and be destroyed with scissors for foolproof data security, officials said.

The 25-gigabite Blu-ray optical disc is 51 percent paper and was developed jointly with Toppan Printing Co. Ltd. of Japan.

"Since a paper disc can be cut by scissors easily, it is simple to preserve data security when disposing of the disc," Toppan managing director Hideaki Kawai said in a joint statement with Sony.

Masanobu Yamamoto, senior managing director at optical disc development division of Sony, said the firms were able to use paper in the new disc as the Blu-ray technology does not require laser light to travel through the substrate.

The technical details of how it is possible to use paper as a data storage disc would be disclosed Tuesday at a conference in Monterey, California, according to Sony.

The combination of paper material and printing technology is also expected to lead to a reduction in cost per disc and will expand usage, the two partners said. It has yet to be decided when the disc will be commercially available.

The use of paper in electronics products is not new for Sony.

In 1950 when Japan was still struggling to rise from the ashes of World War II, Sony, then called Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo, made magnetic tapes using a similar grade of paper to that used for ordinary envelopes.

Sony used racoon hair brushes to daub magnetic powder over the paper to produce what it cally "SONI TAPE", starting its history as an audio-video products maker.

The Blu-ray disc format allows high-capacity optical-disc storage to be used for such technologies as high-definition televisions.

A group of manufacturers was set up in 2002 to promote a common standard for the disc format comprising Dell Inc., Hewlett-Packard, Hitachi, LG Electronics, Matsunutsa Electronics Industrial, Mitsubishi Electric Corp, Pioneer Corp, Royal Philips Electronics, Samsung Electronics, Sharp Corp, Sony Corp (NYSE:SNE - news) (news - web sites) and Thomson.


Offline slowhand

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • PinoyDVD Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,269
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: DVD-busters: HD-DVD, Blu-ray discs and EVD
« Reply #149 on: Jun 21, 2004 at 09:41 AM »
At a recent press conference, a Sony executive said:

Sony has 1,500 titles ready to go for High Definition. Any Sony DVD that has "Mastered in High Definition" on the back of the case means it's ready to be reissued for a Blu-ray DVD player.

If you're like me, you'd want to pay attention to the second sentence, to minimize double-dipping.