Author Topic: Filipino films  (Read 386961 times)

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Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #60 on: Oct 28, 2002 at 10:27 PM »
I woldn't be surprised--big budget.  But I didn't notice.

Offline RMN

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #61 on: Nov 08, 2002 at 04:00 PM »
I just caught the trailer of Denzel Washington's  John Q and the premise of the movie is strikingly  similar (but not exactly the same)  to that of Kapit sa Patalim.

« Last Edit: Jan 26, 2003 at 11:27 AM by rmn »

Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #62 on: Nov 09, 2002 at 12:42 PM »
Orapronobis is far more believable (of course, it's by Pete Lacaba, who was thick in the middle of it all). John ! is an absurd movie.  Very slick, very Hollywood, with a ridiculous ending.

Offline Noel_Vera

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The 1980s
« Reply #63 on: Nov 10, 2002 at 12:42 AM »
The other Golden Age of Philippine Cinema

Noel Vera

When we talk about the Golden Age of Philippine Cinema we often mean the '50s, with artists like Manuel Silos, Manuel Conde, Lamberto Avellana, and Gerardo de Leon, or (and more often) the '70s, with artists like Lino Brocka, Ishmael Bernal, Celso Ad. Castillo, Mario O'Hara, Mike de Leon.

The problem is that golden ages, like any other cultural and social movement, rarely follow calendar dates.  The dawning of December 31, 1979 didn't mean the conditions and talents that created the great films of the '70s suddenly vanished--if anything, conditions persisted, and some of the artists from the previous decade did their best work in the next one.

Perhaps not in the case of Lino Brocka.  Brocka in three incredible years, from 1974 to 1976, would direct the three greatest Filipino films in contemporary cinema: "Tinimbang Ka Ngunit Kulang" (You Were Weighed and Found Wanting, 1974), "Maynila sa Kuko ng Liwanag" (Manila in the Claws of Neon, 1975), and "Insiang" (1976).  He would still be active in the '80s, but by about this time Brocka discovered politics, and (or so the theory goes) it ended his career as an artist.  "Bayan Ko" (My Country, 1985), and "Orapronobis" (Fight for Us, 1989) are not much more than political agitprop; excellently made and highly effective agitprop, but compared to something like "Insiang," which criticizes Philippine society in a subtler, more complex, more dramatically intense level...

Ishmael Bernal, on the other hand, would sound off the start of the decade with his masterpiece, the epic "Manila By Night" (1980).  The film has aged a little; visually it has nothing on Brocka's "Maynila Sa Kuko" (brilliantly shot by Mike de Leon), and the city onscreen looks actually cleaner and more livable than it is today.  But the sheer nastiness of the characters, the corrosive nature of life in Bernal's underworld, the overall nihilism of the work--tempered by the artist's unnervingly cool distance towards his material--is still a wonder to behold.

Bernal was active for the remainder of the decade.  His '80s output--in terms of range, variety, overall quality--rivaled (some would say bested) Brocka's: the hallucinogenic "Himala" (Miracle, 1981); the sparely realist "Relasyon" (Relationship, 1982); the painfully honest "Broken Marriage" (1983); the quiet, intense "Hinugot sa Langit" (Wrenched from Heaven, 1985--incidentally, one of the finest films ever about abortion).

One filmmaker who came into his own in the '80s is Mike de Leon.  In the mid-'70s he was both producer and cinematographer of Brocka's "Maynila sa Kuko;" he also directed the memorably gothic "Itim" (Black, 1976).  From 1980 to 1982, however, he made a trilogy of films that many consider his best work: "Kakabakaba Ka Ba?" (Worried? 1980), "Kisapmata" (Blink of an Eye, 1981) and "Batch '81" (1982).  "Kakabakaba" is sophisticated satire (perhaps too sophisticated) with a distinctively designed look. "Kisapmata" is a simple horror story about a pregnant daughter and her overbearing father but one so powerfully made (I think it's the best film he's ever done) it became a metaphor for many things: the Marcos dictatorship; the oppressive dominance of men; and de Leon's own dark, twisted sensibilities.  "Batch '81," about school fraternities, is more clearly an allegory on fascism; if it's a step down from "Kisapmata," that may be because it's difficult to improve on a great and perfect film.

De Leon would go on to make the overrated "Sister Stella L." (1984), his one nod to fashionable liberal politics, and the underrated "Hindi Nahahati ang Langit" (The Heavens Indivisible, 1985), his one fascinatingly subversive attempt at adapting "komiks" material (about a young man and his unaccountably intense attraction to his half-sister) to the big screen.

Mario O'Hara, like Bernal and Brocka before him, would make his "Manila" movie--three of them: "Condemned" (1984); "Bulaklak ng City Jail" (Flowers of the City Jail, 1985), and "Bagong Hari" (The New King, 1986).  O'Hara's "Manila Trilogy" represents a range of genres (from noir to drama to action) and social milieu (from street hustlers to women convicts to an alternate-reality vision of Manila) that few Filipino filmmakers have even approached in terms of sweep and intensity.

Finally, the '80s were nothing if not the Golden Age of the Filipino "bold" film.  These were erotic films that, for one reason or another, the Marcos dictatorship had allowed to be made--had, in fact, encouraged, through funding from the Experimental Cinema of the Philippines, and through uncut screenings at Imelda Marcos' Manila Film Center.  The rational?  Who knows? Perhaps the Marcoses were too engrossed in other troubles (the Aquino assassination; the devaluation of the peso; the swelling opposition movement).  Perhaps they wanted to show the world that they were more liberalized, more enlightened.  Perhaps they encouraged sex flicks to distract the general public--a kind of desperate bid to give them what they want, "bread and circuses" style.

Whatever the underlying cause, the effect is a blooming of erotic flesh, photographed in a variety of storytelling styles, often by newcomers to the industry who are either doing their debut features, or have done them not too long ago.  Of the better ones I might cite Abbo de la Cruz's "Misteryo sa Tuwa" (Joyful Mystery, 1984) a somewhat sadistic fable on the evils of money; Chito Rono's "Private Show" (1986), a noir on live-sex performers; and William Pascual's "Takaw Tukso" (Temptation, 1986), a Bergmanesque chamber piece written by Armando Lao.  Three others I would consider not just the three best Filipino erotic films ever made but three among the '80s' best: Tikoy Aguiluz's "Boatman" (1984), also about live-sex performers, but with Aguiluz's unique documentary style; Peque Gallaga's "Scorpio Nights," a no-holes-barred film about a student screwing his downstairs neighbor's wife; and Laurice Guillen's "Init sa Magdamag" (Midnight Passion 1985, script by Racquel Villavicencio), about a woman drawn, willingly or unwillingly we aren't sure, into a sadomasochistic relationship.

Mention should be made of an extraordinary debut that was neither erotic nor mainstream; it wasn't even a full-length feature.  "Ang Magpakailanman" (The Eternity, 1983) is a twenty-minute short written, directed, and photographed by Raymond Red, about a mysterious book of the same title and the young man searching for it.  The film has more wit, originality, and visual imagination than a dozen lesser Filipino features; and though Red will eventually do what Brocka, Bernal, and de Leon failed to do--become the first Filipino to win the Palme d'Or in Cannes with his short "Anino" (Shadows, 2000)--this remains his real masterpiece.

A final note: two films stand out amongst an amazing array of greats and near-greats--Gallaga's "Scorpio Nights" and O'Hara's "Bagong Hari."  Both expressed the nihilism and despair of the Filipino people in the waning Marcos era--"Scorpio Nights" with its breathtakingly death-defying sex, "Bagong Hari" with its relentlessly violent depictions of death.   Both, literally, were the last words on the last years of the Marcos era; there's an almost terminal aura about them, as if anything more said--on sex, on violence, on everything in between--would only be redundant.  With impeccable timing, the month after "Bagong Hari" closed on its opening day on January, 1986 (it was a commercial disaster), the EDSA Revolution overthrew the Marcos dictatorship--making "Bagong Hari" the last great film of the '80s, and (arguably) of the "'70s Golden Age of Philippine Cinema."

After February 1986--nothing; literally nothing.  Marcos' successor, President Corazon Aquino, was no friend--not even a good influence--on the local film industry (there's joke going around that Aquino's two great contributions to Philippine cinema was Censors chief and moral hypocrite "Manoling" Morato and her appallingly untalented aspiring-actress daughter, Kris Aquino).  The only significant Filipino production made from 1987 to 1989, in fact, was Lino Brocka's "Orapronobis"--which was made with French money and which accuses Aquino of being even worse than Marcos, the way a weak leader with little or no control over her administration is worse than a dictator.  It wouldn't be until 1995--nine long years--that anything even resembling a recovery would appear in the distance.

(Comments? Email me at [email protected])


Offline sidney

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #64 on: Nov 11, 2002 at 12:32 PM »
Alma Moreno's launching movie was LIGAW NA BULAKLAK directed by Ishmael Bernal. She was one of the seven bold stars introduced by Jesse Ejercito during the 70's. The others were Elizabeth Oropesa, Daria Ramirez, Chanda Romero, Beth Bautista, Amy Austria and Lorna Tolentino. All bold stars that all turned out to be fine actesses. Well, except for Alma Moreno. :(
Alma Moreno was also did a great job in "Basag" and  Buhay ako sa ilalim ikaw sa ibabaw w/ Amalia Fuentes. ;)

Offline sidney

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #65 on: Nov 11, 2002 at 12:44 PM »
My Favorite Nora films are:
Atsay
Bona
Tatlong Taong Walang Diyos
Bilangin Mo Ang Mga Bituin Sa Langit
Himala  and Super G.

My Favorite Vilma movies are:
Burlesk Queen
Tag Ulan Sa Tag Araw
Kampanerang Kuba
Anak
Sinasamba Kita
and her Darna series

Alma Films
Ligaw na Bulaklak
Bomba Star
Manila By Night
Basag
Bundok Ng Susong Dalaga
Buhay Ako Sa Ilalim Ikaw Sa Ibabaw

I also love
Gina Alajar's -Salome
Amy Austria's- Brutal
Charo Santos- Itim
Susan Roses- Gumising Ka Maruja
Amalia Fuentes- Ang Isinumpa
Edna Luna's Dyesebel :D

Offline sidney

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #66 on: Nov 11, 2002 at 12:51 PM »
I almost Forgot Hilda Koronel's Insiang
And Oro Plata Mata.


Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #67 on: Nov 11, 2002 at 09:41 PM »
Bomba Star was fun.

You didn't like Mga Bilanggong Birhen, Sidney?

Offline Fantômas

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #68 on: Nov 13, 2002 at 01:23 AM »
As you can imagine, if a French man (as I am) suscribes to a Filipino forum about movies - well, it's because he is interested to learn about films from the Philippines! so the detailed, very well written analysis of Pinoy movies by Mr. Vera are of the higher interest for me!
However, the concept of "artistic" movies, in opposition to other movies made "only for entertainment" being only that - a cocept -, in fact I think that EVERY film ever produced must be preserved for posterity.
We have a perfect example of that with French cinema. Of course, it's always pleasing to watch again and again some masterpieces as "Children of Paradise" and others, but in fact many French films, considered as only "watchables" at the time of their original release, are now totally re-revaluated and we can be happy that somebody took care of these "inferior" productions, years ago...
Henri Langlois, the co-founder of the Cinémathèque Française, once told me that EVERY film must be salvaged, not just some chosen by elitist critics. So, I hope to read articles on "popular" pinoy movies as well, such as the "Darna" series, the horror films, comedies, etc.
It's incredibly difficult to obtain precise informations about those films, even in the Philippines apparently. Has anybody written a complete catalogue of Pinoy movies, for intance, with cast/crew credits and synopsis for EACH film ever produced ? even in Turkey, that kind of books exist, so why not in the Philippines, one of the most important countries when we speak of movies !?

Offline RMN

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #69 on: Nov 13, 2002 at 11:15 AM »
Sadly, I am not familiar and have not seen any of Mario O Hara's films (though I remember him in Tinimbang). When will I ever get to see his works?

Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #70 on: Nov 13, 2002 at 11:52 PM »
rmn--

O'Hara wrote Insiang.  If you've seen that, you've seen one of his best screenplays.  He also wrote Tinimbang.

Do you have Skycable?  On Cinema One (I buy Skyguide every month, someone linked to a place to download their sked once, but I haven't really gone into it) you see some.  Condemned is shown once in a while, also Tatlong Taong Walang Diyos, and Babae sa Bubungang Lata, which I like very much.  

Also Halimaw sa Banga, Mga Bilanggong Birhen, Tatlong Ina, Isang Anak, The Fatima Buen Story, Johnny Tinoso and the Proud Beauty (all flawed but interesting) and I hear, I haven't seen, Prinsesang Gusgusin.  Also Takot Ako Eh, To Mama With Love, and Manananggal in Manila, which aren't very good.

Fantomas--

You open many a can of worms, my friend.

I DO believe a lot of popular films are being neglected.  Joey Gosengfiao's films and Elwood Perez's.  The Darna and the Giants film was fun.  Gosengfiao's Temptation Island, let me tell you, is stranger than anything you'll find in Pedro Almodovar--and he did it in the '70s.

Nowadays worth watching popular flicks would be Joyce Bernal's.  Romantic comedies, light, but well made.

Offline pinoymovies

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #71 on: Nov 14, 2002 at 08:26 AM »
Sadly, I am not familiar and have not seen any of Mario O Hara's films (though I remember him in Tinimbang). When will I ever get to see his works?

Here are some of the movies that Mario O'Hara directed that are available at www.regalfilms.com on VHS or VCD:

Sisa

Babae sa Bubungang Lata
 
Pangarap ng Puso

The Fatima Buen Story

I wish Regal Films would make a available on DVD the Mario O'hara helmed Kastilyong Buhanging with Nora and Lito Lapid. That was produced by Regal Films.

Edited to correct the title as pointed out by Noel on the next post.
« Last Edit: Nov 15, 2002 at 12:17 PM by pinoymovies »

Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #72 on: Nov 14, 2002 at 12:35 PM »
I think that's Pangarap ng Puso.

And be careful of the summary!  It's all spoilers.

I would recommend Bubungang Lata and Fatima Buen highly.  Pangarap and Sisa I think are even better--are perhaps great (I prefer them over Batang West Side), but not everyone is going to like them.

Offline RMN

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #73 on: Nov 14, 2002 at 03:26 PM »
Wait a minute, I have seen Fatima Buen and Isang...
Too bad we no longer hsve cinema one...

Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #74 on: Nov 14, 2002 at 11:23 PM »
You should change your cable provider.  Cinema One is the only reason I stuck to Skycable.  It has practically all the great films of the 70s, and some amazing obscure chocies.  Temptation Island, Salawahan, Darna and the Giants, the ORIGINAL Tag Ulan sa Tag Init...

Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #75 on: Nov 15, 2002 at 02:03 AM »
pinoymovies, checked out the Regal website, great database, thanks (Fantomas should see it).  I noticed the VHS are more expensive.  Is the picture quality better than in the VCDs?

Offline xage

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #76 on: Nov 15, 2002 at 07:11 AM »
Speaking of Filipino Films.. Any recommended Chillin Horror Film made here?

Coz most I saw are just plain cheesy plots....

Mixed with nonsense humor and as in cheesy Special effects... kinda like B direct to video movies made in US
[img width=163 height=49]http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b221/x

Offline pinoymovies

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #77 on: Nov 15, 2002 at 10:32 AM »
"You're a rich guy anyway"

Funny, FLIM!

"Add a commentarybetween you and Mario Hernando"

That would be too one-sided.  Like that dogfighting bulldog in that Mark Twain story who liked to grab the enemy's hind legs--when he faced an opponent that had lost its hind legs, he was lost...

Noel, I was re-reading your interview with Mario O'hara and it reminded of this post.  From that interview alone, you have plenty of materials for a DVD commentary. When you asked Mario O'hara how he got Tatlong Taong Walang Diyos and went on discussing other details about certain scenes, I thought, this is perfect for a DVD Commentary.

When you asked Mario about the scene where the women circle Nora, cutting off her hair and Mario replied where he got the idea, I wish I could see that scene right there as I was reading it. That's why DVD commentary is so popular. I posted the excerpts at my website so if anyone is interested they can read it here.

You should do more interviews like this. It may not make it to a DVD commentary but at least we can read  it.

Quote
pinoymovies, checked out the Regal website, great database, thanks (Fantomas should see it).  I noticed the VHS are more expensive.  Is the picture quality better than in the VCDs?

Well, I quit buying VHS's awhile back. The last one I bought was an old movie, Bernal's Manila By Night, so the picture's not too good and its missing the credits. You should read the posts comparing VCDs and DVDs.
« Last Edit: Nov 15, 2002 at 12:19 PM by pinoymovies »

Offline RMN

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #78 on: Nov 15, 2002 at 03:08 PM »
You should change your cable provider.  Cinema One is the only reason I stuck to Skycable.  It has practically all the great films of the 70s, and some amazing obscure chocies.  Temptation Island, Salawahan, Darna and the Giants, the ORIGINAL Tag Ulan sa Tag Init...

I think its sad if not unfair that you have to be a subscriber of either Sky or Home to see all these classic Filipino films on Cinema One (which I enjoyed a lot when we still had it)? Why won't ABS-CBN release their vast film library of cinema classics (they've been snapping up a lot of movies these past few years )on video?
« Last Edit: Jan 26, 2003 at 11:29 AM by rmn »

Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #79 on: Nov 16, 2002 at 12:39 AM »
Well, they're available.  I don't look a gift horse in the mouth...or I make it a point to subscribe to a winning horse...

Did you know Cinema One is Sky's most consistently popular channel?  More than MTV, or HBO, or Star World OR movies?  True.  

Offline Noel_Vera

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HIBLA
« Reply #80 on: Nov 16, 2002 at 01:06 AM »
Hibla

It's two hours worth of excuses to peek at Rica and Maui's silicon boobs through various layers of gauze, and from various angles, is all. The psychology is ridiculous, the dialogue terrible, the acting awful (Rica and Maui sound like Assumptionistas vacationing in Antipolo).  The cinematography, which is well done, only makes the bad acting and bad dialogue stand out--looks great, sounds awful!  

The last twenty minutes, though, are worth the price of the ticket--that is one of the funniest endings I've ever seen--and I love that Ever-Burning Nipa Hut: can flame for twenty minutes and still have enough heat to consume Ricky Davao!

Good camp fun. Bring tomatoes.

 

Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #81 on: Nov 16, 2002 at 02:58 AM »
Poor Quark.  I got interested when I learned he helped write the script.   Now I've seen it I hope he wrote as little as possible.

Poor Ricky Davao--after giving a great performance in Ruel Vernal's role in the theater version of Insiang, he has to go and do this!  Maybe when I see him I'll ask him how it was...

Offline RMN

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #82 on: Nov 18, 2002 at 04:16 PM »
Here's something that I read.

Local movie stars as movie producers...

During the collapse of the studio era, a lot of our big movie stars established their own film production outfits. FPJ, of course, set-up FPJ Productions and Jafer, Erap had JE, and Dolphy RVQ. Later on came Nora's NV, Vilma's VS Films while Nino Mulach also had his own production outfit.
VS Films went bankrupt due to a variety of reasons which, unfortunately, caused Vilma to loose everything inculding her  Magallanes Village home. It turns out, Vilma not only starred in but also produced Pagputi ang uwak, pag-itim ng tagak by Celso ad Castillo. The film was beset by so many delays that her funds started to dry-up. Another reason for her company's unraveling was that she was too trusting and was duped by a lot of people (there were times, she said, that the film reels contained nothing).
(there are other stars who established their own outfits perhaps their others who can add to this list incomplete list)
« Last Edit: Jan 26, 2003 at 11:30 AM by rmn »

Offline Lex Luthor

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Re:HIBLA
« Reply #83 on: Nov 18, 2002 at 04:22 PM »
Hibla

It's two hours worth of excuses to peek at Rica and Maui's silicon boobs through various layers of gauze, and from various angles, is all. The psychology is ridiculous, the dialogue terrible, the acting awful (Rica and Maui sound like Assumptionistas vacationing in Antipolo).  The cinematography, which is well done, only makes the bad acting and bad dialogue stand out--looks great, sounds awful!  

The last twenty minutes, though, are worth the price of the ticket--that is one of the funniest endings I've ever seen--and I love that Ever-Burning Nipa Hut: can flame for twenty minutes and still have enough heat to consume Ricky Davao!

Good camp fun. Bring tomatoes.

 


Hahaha. no words could be more fitting... ;D

Offline Centurion Obama

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #84 on: Nov 18, 2002 at 04:23 PM »
actually, I found it very tongue-in-cheek, the humor in Hibla.  It was quite obvious that Quark and Yam we're taking a jab at Filipino ST films with this movie.  Yam said, accdg to qrk, that this was the movie that he had the most fun in directing.
Free Burma pa rin!

Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #85 on: Nov 19, 2002 at 02:09 AM »
Well, I had fun laughing at it.  The last twenty minutes, anyway.  The previous hour or so was durn boring.

Offline sidney

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #86 on: Nov 20, 2002 at 04:47 PM »
You should change your cable provider.  Cinema One is the only reason I stuck to Skycable.  It has practically all the great films of the 70s, and some amazing obscure chocies.  Temptation Island, Salawahan, Darna and the Giants, the ORIGINAL Tag Ulan sa Tag Init...

I love Pilipino movies, sayang at mahirap ng hanapin ang mga ito.  Here's a list of my pinoy movie collection on vhs ( not recorded on TV).

Salome, Ina ka Ng Anak mo, Maynila Sa Kuko ng Liwanag, Burlesk Queen (Vilma) , Gumising Ka Maruja, Bomba Star, 8 Darna films, 4 Dyesebel films, Pag Puti ng Uwak, Pag Itim Ng Tagak, Relasyon, Ina, Kapatid, Anak, Tag Ulan Sa Tag Araw (Vilma) Himala, Ina Ka Ng Anak Mo, Bundok Ng Susong Dalaga, Step Sisters, Diary Of Cristina Gaston, Batya't Palo-Palo, 3 Mukha Ni Rosa Vilma, Ang Kampanerang Kuba, Mrs Eva Fonda 16, Disgrasyada (Rio Locsin) PX, Angela Markado, Karma, Inagaw mo Ang Lahat Sa Akin, Kaya Kung Abutin Ang Langit, Teptation Island, Katawang Alabok, Sharon Cuneta films, Kung Kasalanan man, Gumapang Ka Sa Lusak, Haplos, Diosa, Diyosa (Rita Gomez) Si Gemma Ang Babaeng Kidlat ( Evangeline Pasqual) Lagi Na Lamang Ba Akong Babae, Waikiki, Ang Kambal Sa Uma, Langis At Tubig, Adultery: Aida Macaraeg, Young Love (NORA, Vilma) Pinay American Style, Ang Panday (Animated version) Teen Age Marriage, Biktima( Vilma Santos) Beba The Mermaid ( Lotis Key) King Kiam And I, Magandang Gabi Sa Inyong Lahat, Roma Amor, Malikot, Magkaribal, Itim.  And more.
Insiang

 :)

Offline sidney

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #87 on: Nov 20, 2002 at 04:54 PM »
Bomba Star was fun.

You didn't like Mga Bilanggong Birhen, Sidney?

Hindi ko napanood ang " Mga Bilangong Birhen"  sayang.

Offline RMN

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #88 on: Nov 20, 2002 at 05:55 PM »
Are your VHS tapes still in good condition?  You hav esome pretty good movies.

Offline Noel_Vera

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Re:Filipino films
« Reply #89 on: Nov 20, 2002 at 09:22 PM »
Bilanggong Birhen is a pretty good, maybe near great flawed film.  

I got a really crazy story about the making of that movie--well, two.  But if I tell them, I prolly won't live long... ;D

Do you have the following--

Bona
Bakit Bughaw Ang Langit (1981)
Gaano Ko Ikaw Kamahal? (1982)
Ibulong Mo Sa Puso (1983)
Uhaw na Pag-ibig (1983)
Prinsesang Gusgusin (1986)